Where you live can influence how you manage Diabetes

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Study says people with diabetics who live in poor communities would have a harder time controlling their disease since everything they do would be influenced by the community to which they belong.

If you live in a community with lower income rate then you would not have an access to resources that don’t have any access to exercise and healthy eating because both have long been linked to an increased risk of developing diabetes.
For the current study, however, researchers focused on 15,308 patients who already had diabetes to see if their neighborhoods might impact how well they lived with the disease.

At the start of the study, all of the patients had poorly controlled diabetes, based on blood tests that show the percentage of hemoglobin (a molecule on red blood cells) that is coated with sugar. So-called hemoglobin A1c levels reflect average blood sugar levels over about three months. Readings above 6.5 signal diabetes, and everyone in the study had readings of at least 7.5.

Over six months, reductions in A1c were 0.07 per cent less in townships with the most socioeconomic deprivation than in the most affluent neighborhoods, the study found.

At the same time, A1c improvements were up to 0.19 per cent greater in communities with the most exercise opportunities than in the places with the fewest resources for physical activity. A1c improvements were also 0.10 per cent bigger in areas with the best food availability.

“People with type 2 diabetes do not live in their doctors’ offices, and most of the work they do to control their disease, such as eating a healthy diet, exercising, and taking their medications, happens in the communities in which they live,” said lead study author Annemarie Hirsch of the Geisinger Health System in Danville, Pennsylvania.

It is very elementary since if the community don’t have such available healthy food and safe area to exercise then you won’t have an access to those. You would need to go to an area where you would have access to those.

“People with type 2 diabetes do not live in their doctors’ offices, and most of the work they do to control their disease, such as eating a healthy diet, exercising, and taking their medications, happens in the communities in which they live,” said lead study author Annemarie Hirsch of the Geisinger Health System in Danville, Pennsylvania.

“People with type 2 diabetes do not live in their doctors’ offices, and most of the work they do to control their disease, such as eating a healthy diet, exercising, and taking their medications, happens in the communities in which they live,” said lead study author Annemarie Hirsch of the Geisinger Health System in Danville, Pennsylvania.
It just proves that where you lives would have an impact on how to you would be able to manage your health condition.

Managing diabetes doesn’t mean that you need to break your bank account as there are ways to manage it without doing that.  According to US News, we can also save money without compromising care. If you need medication, as most people with diabetes do, cost can vary considerably.

Source:  Channel News Asia, US Health News