Change of Lifestyle is secret to reversing type 2 Diabetes

change of lifestyle

Managing diabetes is not easy to do since you need to change a lot in your lifestyle.  The problem with that is the society since they are the ones that are influencing to habits that would be bad for you.  Most of the time, it is your loves that would complicate things sine they would insists their own lifestyle to you.  They might know that you are suffering from diabetes, but they can’t fully understand it so they would insist their diet to you. But, there is a way out to type 2 diabetes. As hard that it is, but your lifestyle could help you get rid of diabetes, according to new study.

Type diabetes is related to obesity, as the fat accumulated in the stomach the abdomen prevents the proper function of the pancreas. It can lead to serious and life-threatening complications, including blindness and foot amputations, heart and kidney disease.

According to the new study from study from Newcastle and Glasgow Universities shows that the disease can be reversed by losing weight, so that sufferers no longer have to take medication and are free of the symptoms and risks. Nine out of 10 people in the trial who lost 15kg (two-and-a-half stone) or more put their type 2 diabetes into remission.

Prof Roy Taylor from Newcastle University, lead researcher in the trial funded by Diabetes UK, said: “These findings are very exciting. They could revolutionize the way type 2 diabetes is treated. This builds on the work into the underlying cause of the condition, so that we can target management effectively.

“Substantial weight loss results in reduced fat inside the liver and pancreas, allowing these organs to return to normal function. What we’re seeing … is that losing weight isn’t just linked to better management of type 2 diabetes: significant weight loss could actually result in lasting remission.”

The number of type 2 diabetes had quadruple in the last 35 years, rising from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014. This is expected to climb to 642 million by 2040. Type 2 diabetes affects almost 1 in 10 adults in the UK and costs the NHS about £14bn a year.

Usually type 2 diabetes is treated with regular maintenance of medication and in some cases, bariatric surgery is administered to restrict the restrict stomach capacity, which has also been shown to reverse the disease.  Bariatric surgery (weight loss surgery) includes a variety of procedures performed on people who have obesity. Weight loss is achieved by reducing the size of the stomach with a gastric band or through removal of a portion of the stomach (sleeve gastrectomy or biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch) or by resecting and re-routing the small intestine to a small stomach pouch (gastric bypass surgery).

“Rather than addressing the root cause, management guidelines for type 2 diabetes focus on reducing blood sugar levels through drug treatments. Diet and lifestyle are touched upon, but diabetes remission by cutting calories is rarely discussed,” said Taylor.

“A major difference from other studies is that we advised a period of dietary weight loss with no increase in physical activity, but during the long-term follow up increased daily activity is important. Bariatric surgery can achieve remission of diabetes in about three-quarters of people, but it is more expensive and risky, and is only available to a small number of patients.”

The trial results, published in the Lancet and presented at the International Diabetes Federation Congress in Abu Dhabi, show that after one year, participants had lost an average of 10kg, and nearly half had reverted to a non-diabetic state.

There were 298 adults on the trial aged 20–65, who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes within the last six years, from 49 primary care practices in Scotland and Tyneside. Half of the practices put their patients on the very low calorie diet, while the rest were a control group, in which patients received usual care. Only 4% of the control group managed to achieve remission.

The diet was a formula of 825–853 calories per day for 3 to 5 months, followed by the stepped reintroduction of food over two to eight weeks. The participants were all given support throughout, including cognitive behavior therapy and were encouraged to exercise.

Prof Michael Lean says that even if you have diabetes for the last six years, it can be treated. The secret is through change of lifestyle as it is a long term approach to the problem. Diet and exercise should go hand in hand to treat diabetes type 2.

Sources: Wikipedia, The Guradian